Betty Jane Rhodes - Yours (Quiéreme Mucho) (1948)

Tema en 'Canciones Del Ayer / Versiones en ingles de cancio' iniciado por darko47, 26 Oct 2016.


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    Betty Jane Rhodes (April 21, 1921 – December 27, 2011).jpg * Betty Jane Rhodes (April 21, 1921 – December 27, 2011)
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    Betty Jane Rhodes (April 21, 1921 – December 27, 2011) -5.jpg Betty Jane Rhodes (April 21, 1921 – December 27, 2011) -15.jpg [​IMG]

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  2. darko47

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    Yours (Quiéreme Mucho)
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    "Quiéreme mucho" is a criolla-bolero composed between 1915 and 1917 by Gonzalo Roig [​IMG] - (Havana, 20 July 1890 – Havana, 13 June 1970) with lyrics by Augustin Rodriguez. It was first recorded in 1922 by singer Tito Schipa. In 1931, the English version, "Yours", was published in the United States. It featured lyrics in English written by Albert Gamse and Jack Sherr. Both versions have been extensively recorded and arranged by different musicians, becoming Latin music standard.
    Recorded versions
    Hit versions of "Yours" have been recorded by the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra, Vera Lynn, and Dick Contino. In other languages, Cliff Richard and Julio Iglesias have also had hits.

    The recording by Jimmy Dorsey featured vocals by Bob Eberly and Helen O'Connell and was released by Decca Records as catalog number 3657. It first reached the Billboard Best Seller chart on May 23, 1941, and lasted 13 weeks on the chart, peaking at #2.[2]
    The recording by Vera Lynn was released by London Records as catalog number 1261. It first reached the Billboard Best Seller chart on October 17, 1952, and lasted 8 weeks on the chart, peaking at #8.[2]
    The recording by Dick Contino, an instrumental, was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70455. It reached #27 on its only week on the Billboard Best Seller chart on November 24, 1954.[2]
    The recording by Cliff Richard (with The Shadows) in German, as Du Bist Mein Erster Gedanke, went to #15[3] in Germany in 1966.
    The recording by Julio Iglesias, in several languages, including French entitled Ou Est Passe Ma Boheme went to number 1 in France in 1979 achieving double platinum sales. A Spanish-English version by Julio was a hit in England in 1981.

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    Also recorded by:

    Anni-Frid Lyngstad and Marcus Österdahls Orchestra (in Swedish) (1967)
    Ray Anthony and his orchestra
    Lucie Arnaz
    Chet Atkins
    Gene Autry
    Baja Marimba Band
    The Beau Marks
    Vikki Carr
    José Carreras
    Ray Charles
    Bing Crosby
    Xavier Cugat (vocal: Dinah Shore) (1939)
    Dick Dale
    The Del-Vikings (1956)
    Plácido Domingo, who also named one of his albums after the Spanish-language version of the song, Quiéreme Mucho (2002)
    The Duprees
    Percy Faith
    Freddy Fender
    Ibrahim Ferrer (2007)
    The Flamingos (1959)
    Connie Francis (1960)
    John Gary
    Benny Goodman and his orchestra (vocal: Helen Forrest) (1941)
    Eydie Gormé
    Eddy Howard
    Engelbert Humperdinck (1985)
    Julio Iglesias (1979)
    Joni James (1963)
    Andre Kostelanetz and his orchestra
    Alfredo Kraus
    Charlie Kunz
    Frankie Laine with Michel LeGrand (1958)
    Julie London (1963)
    Frankie Lymon & The Teenagers (1958)
    Tony Martin
    Vaughn Monroe and his orchestra (vocal: Marilyn Duke) (1941)
    Nana Mouskouri
    Jim Reeves
    Marty Robbins (1962)
    Dickie Rock
    Linda Ronstadt (1992)
    Edmundo Ros
    The Three Degrees
    Jerry Vale (1963)
    Caterina Valente
    Billy Vaughn and his orchestra
    Hugo Winterhalter and his orchestra
    Finbar Wright
    Pitingo
    /Wikipedia
     

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